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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity found in the catalog.

Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity

The Ceramic Evidence, Acts from a Ph.D. - seminar for young ... 12-15 February 1998 (Halicarnassian Studies)

  • 199 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Univ Pr of Southern Denmark .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social Science,
  • Mediterranean Region,
  • Sociology,
  • Archaeology,
  • Congresses,
  • Pottery, Ancient,
  • Pottery, Classical

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsMaria Berg Briese (Editor), Leif Erik Vaag (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9171150M
    ISBN 108778389585
    ISBN 109788778389589

    Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidence: Proceedings of conferen ce organised by the Dept. for Greek and Roman Studies, To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please Author: Gary Forster. through to studies of connectivity and trade in the eastern Mediterranean during the Late Antique period. The majority of the papers, however, focus on the high point in.

    The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. Demesticha, S. () "Some thoughts on the production and presence of the Late Roman Amphora 13 on Cyprus." Trade Relations in the eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity. The Ceramic Evidence.:

    Start studying Ancient World Chapter 3. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Evidence suggests that during the Hellenistic period, as compared to Classical, Greek women Had as its economic basis control of Middle Eastern trade routes to the Mediterranean. The Antigonids ruled.   There have been a few articles recently on resilience in the ancient world (e.g. here, here, here, et c.) and considering the looming social disruptions caused by the COVID virus, this work feels particularly timely. Last week, the new volume of Studies in Late Antiquity appeared and it included an article by Tamara Lewitt titled “A Viewpoint on Eastern Mediterranean Villages in Late.


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Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity Download PDF EPUB FB2

Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidence (Halicarnassian Studies, vol.

III) Hardcover – April 1, Format: Hardcover. Book Review of Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity, edited by Maria Berg Briese and Leif Erik Vaag Reviewed by Kristina W.

Jacobsen American Journal of Archaeology Vol. No. 2 (April ). The Hardcover of the Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidence (Halicarnassian Due to COVID, orders may be delayed.

Thank you for your : Get this from a library. Trade relations in the eastern Mediterranean from the late Hellenistic period to late antiquity: the ceramic evidence: acts from a Ph. D.-seminar for young scholars, Sandbjerg Manorhouse, February [Maria Berg Briese; Leif Erik Vaag;] -- "The focus of the book is on the interaction of trade and cultures in the Eastern Mediterranean during the late.

Briese, Maria Berg., Vaag, Leif Erik., Trade relations in the eastern Mediterranean from the late Hellenistic period to late antiquity: the ceramic evidence: acts from a Ph.

D.-seminar for young scholars, Sandbjerg Manorhouse, February Table of contents for Trade relations in the eastern Mediterranean from the late Hellenistic period to late antiquity: the ceramic evidence: acts from a Ph.D.-seminar for young scholars, Sandbjerg Manorhouse, February / edited by Maria Berg Briese & Leif Erik Vaag.

Trade Relations. in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidenc. Forfatter: Edited by Maria Berg Briese & Leif Erik Vaag.

ISBN: Halicarnassian Studies vol. III. Book Description: Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean is devoted to the viticulture of two settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD.

Interdisciplinary and ethnographic data supplements the main. What changes occurred between the Greek and Hellenistic periods in the eastern mediterranean. Greek art and culture merged with other cultures in Hellenistic period.

Trade flourished and important scientific advancements were made in centers Alexandria in Egypt. Williams, D.F. () Late Roman amphora 1: a study of diversification.

In, Briese, Maria Berg and Vaag, Leif Erik (eds.) Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidence. (Halicarnassian Studies, III) Acts from a Ph.D.

- seminar for young (12/02/98 - 15/02/98) Odense, by: 4. Two of the most notable Mediterranean civilizations in classical antiquity were the Greek city states and the Greeks expanded throughout the Black Sea and south through the Red Phoenicians spread through the western Mediterranean reaching North Africa and the Iberian the 6th century BC up to including the 5th century BC, many of the significant.

Williams, D.F. (a), Late Roman amphora 1. A study of diversification, in: M. Berg Briese, L.E. Vaag (eds.) Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic : Paulina Komar.

Trade relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the late Hellenistic period to late antiquity; the ceramic evidence. Ancient West & East; v.4 no The Seleukid royal economy; the finances and financial administration of the Seleukid empire.

Reconstructing western civilization; irreverent essays on antiquity. Some thoughts on the production and presence of the Late Roman Amphora 13 on Cyprus. In Briese, M.B. and Vaag, L.E. (eds), Trade relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period fron Late Antiquity: the ceramic evidence.

Odense: –   Trade relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the late Hellenistic period to late antiquity; the ceramic evidence. Angel Nicolaou-Konnari and Chris Schabel, eds., Cyprus: Society and Culture There is therefore much continuity in Phoenician traditions from the Late Bronze Age until the Hellenistic period around B.C.

By the late eighth century B.C., the Phoenicians, alongside the Greeks, had founded trading posts around the entire Mediterranean and excavations of many of these centers have added significantly to our understanding. Ina book by Peter Brown, The World of Late Antiquity, described Late Antiquity as a long-lasting phenomenon (– c.e.), during which the dissolution of the ancient Mediterranean world led to the creation of three civilizations, all equal heirs of antiquity: western Europe, Byzantium, and Islam.

This conception was accompanied by Author: Hervé Inglebert. Introduction: Maritime archaeology and the ancient economy (Andrew Wilson and Damian Robinson) 1. The Shipwrecks of Heracleion-Thonis. Preliminary study and research perspectives (David Fabre) 2.

Developments in Mediterranean shipping and maritime trade from the Hellenistic period to AD (Andrew Wilson) /5(1). A contribution to the study of the Coan trade in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Hellenistic period ’, in Briese, M.

Berg and Vaag, L. (eds), Trade Relations in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Cited by: 1. Trade relations in the eastern Mediterranean from the LRFW 1.

Late Roman Fine Wares. Solving problems of typology and chronology Late Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity: the ceramic evidence. 4. The Long Late Antiquity.

This book represents a really nice contribution to recent trends toward a longer Late Antiquity. From the 18th century, scholars have seen Late Antiquity as both a period of decline and a period that generated many of the core institutions of the Western world.Dr David Williams is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow in Archaeology at the University of Southampton.

I specialise in the physical analysis and characterisation of ancient ceramics and lithics (marbles, building stones, querns, honestones, etc) by thin sectioning, and the trade .Trade Relations: in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Hellenistic Period to Late Antiquity: The Ceramic Evidence: Edited by Maria Berg Briese & Leif Erik Vaag.